Drawing from W.E.B. Du Bois’ concept of double consciousness—the split subjectivity of the oppressed African-American subject—Ghanaian-American filmmaker Akosua Adoma Owusu creates works of cinema embodying a “triple consciousness”—the collision of identities of the African immigrant in the United States. Working in the traditions of Third Cinema, Owusu’s films swirl with a mixture of intersecting subjectivities and perspectives including feminism, queerness and the experience of African immigrants interacting in African, white American, and black American cultures. Owusu appears in person with Leila Weefur of local curatorial collective The Black Aesthetic to discuss recent works including On Monday of Last Week, Mahogany Too and Reluctantly Queer.

Mahogany Too

Artist Bio

Akosua Adoma Owusu (born January 1, 1984) is a Ghanaian-American filmmaker, producer and cinematographer whose films and installation work address the collision of identities, where the African immigrant located in the United States has a “triple consciousness”. Owusu interprets Du Bois’ notion of double consciousness and creates a third cinematic space or consciousness, representing diverse identities including feminism, queerness and African immigrants interacting in African, white American, and black American culture.