Program Type: 
Performance
New Frequencies Fest 2013
South of the Border

Novalima, Mexican Institute of Sound, and DJ Leydis

December 07, 2013
YBCA Forum

Overview

New Frequencies Fest 2013
Next-Wave Global Sounds: South of the Border
Sat, Dec 7, 7 PM
YBCA Forum
General: $25 in Advance / $30 at the Door
Student, Senior, Teacher: $20 in Advance / $25 at the Door
YBCA Members: $20
FREE for YBCA:You

YBCA’s annual two-day music festival, New Frequencies Fest 2013: Next Wave Global Sounds brings us two adventurous nights of underground music from the Americas, featuring genre-bending artists who fuse Appalachian and funk, Afro-Peruvian and electronica, Latin alternative and soul, and Global and experimental. These two programs are at once a reflection upon the past and an anticipation of the future. These accomplished vocalists and instrumentalists blend the sounds of their indigenous roots with the broad spectrum of contemporary American music with a pop sensibility from North and South of the border to create an entirely new vocabulary. Be musically transported across two continents, from the hills of Kentucky to the mountains of Peru, over the course of two electrifying evenings. It’s a journey you won’t want to miss.

7 PM, Pre-Show Talk:
“Mestizo: Roots, Race, Politics, and Music South of the Border”
with Camilo Lara (Mexican Institute of Sound) and members of Novalima

Join us for a lively pre-concert conversation with the artists moderated by Catalina Maria Johnson in which artists discuss how they respond to the social and political realities of their countries, and how it shapes their music. Free with performance ticket.

8 PM, Performance:
Contagious electro-acoustic rhythms of South and Central America close out New Frequencies Fest 2013 with an invigorating night of incendiary dance music. Founded by four friends from Lima with a shared passion for both traditional Afro-Peruvian music and modern DJ culture, Novalima uses subtle electronic textures and manipulated traditional instruments to create a percussive masterpiece that moves effortlessly between conventional organic roots music and progressive digital sounds. Their efforts have broken down boundaries, uniting seemingly irreconcilable genres, communities, and generations to create an inspiring movement that has revolutionized the music scene in their native Peru. Mexican Institute of Sound (M.I.S.) is the project name of DJ and producer Camilo Lara. In his famed recordings and with his live band, Camilo performs an infectious mix of vintage Mexican pop, norteño, cumbia, and folk music with hints of everything from early 20th-century corridos to techno. And to keep the audience on its feet well into the night, Oakland-based Afro-Cuban DJ Leydis will spin her unique blend of Latin music, R&B classics, and roots reggae.

“El que no tiene dinga, tiene mandinga”
4 PM
Screening Room
FREE with RSVP

The title of this peer panel of global and Alternative Latin music journalists is a Spanish-language saying that refers to the indigenous and African ancestry of all Latinos. We invite bloggers, music critics, writers, radio programmers, broadcasters, DJs, and alternative Latin music fans to join us in a discussion about how music journalism can be a tool to shape an understanding of our mestizo/mixed race identity in conjunction with La Bohemia Productions and moderated by Catalina Maria Johnson.

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Events

  • New Frequencies Fest: “El que no tiene dinga, tiene mandinga”
    Dec 7, 2013 4:00pm
    Screening Room
    FREE with RSVP

  • South American Rhythms: Novalima, Mexican Institute of Sound, and DJ Leydis
    Dec 7, 2013 7:00pm
    YBCA Forum

    $25 in Advance / $30 at the Door
    $20 Student, Senior, Teacher in Advance / $25 Student, Senior, Teacher at the Door
    $20 YBCA Members; FREE for YBCA:You

    Pre-Show Talk: 7 PM
    “Mestizo: Roots, Race, Politics, and Music South of the Border” with Camilo Lara (Mexican Institute of Sound) and members of Novalima

    Performance: 8 PM
    Contagious electro-acoustic rhythms of South and Central America close out New Frequencies Fest 2013 with an invigorating night of incendiary dance music. Founded by four friends from Lima with a shared passion for both traditional Afro-Peruvian music and modern DJ culture, Novalima uses subtle electronic textures and manipulated traditional instruments to create a percussive masterpiece that moves effortlessly between conventional organic roots music and progressive digital sounds. Their efforts have broken down boundaries, uniting seemingly irreconcilable genres, communities, and generations to create an inspiring movement that has revolutionized the music scene in their native Peru. Mexican Institute of Sound (M.I.S.) is the project name of DJ and producer Camilo Lara. In his famed recordings and with his live band, Camilo performs an infectious mix of vintage Mexican pop, norteño, cumbia, and folk music with hints of everything from early 20th-century corridos to techno. And to keep the audience on its feet well into the night, Oakland-based Afro-Cuban DJ Leydis will spin her unique blend of Latin music, R&B classics, and roots reggae.

  • Global Jazz Film Clips & Talk with Myra Melford
    Dec 8, 2013 5:00pm – 7:00pm
    Screening Room
    FREE with RSVP

    In conjunction with the theme of global music and dance this weekend at both the New Frequencies Fest 2013 and 50 Cent Tabernacle, Myra Melford explores the world of jazz by presenting clips of jazz performers from around the world. Come early, take a global dance class then step into the screening room to hear the sounds of global jazz.

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Related Programs

December 6, 2013
YBCA Forum

New Frequencies Fest 2013 brings us two adventurous nights of underground music from the Americas, featuring genre-bending artists who fuse folkloric themes and urban melodies.

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Artist Bio

Novalima
With their first international release, Afro (distributed in the US through Quango Music Group), the four Lima-based producers known as Novalima give the sonically rich history of Peru new life, using brilliantly subtle electronic textures, warm bass tones and drums to create a percussive masterpiece that moves effortlessly between conventional organic roots music and progressive digital sounds. One could even say that Novalima has gone as far as creating their very own genre by manipulating traditional instruments such as the native cajon, quijada, and congas to compliment programmed beats, funk-inspired bass lines, and contemporary piano melodies. Perhaps the most enchanting aspect of Novalima however, is not just their forward thinking approach, but their firm insistence on musical authenticity despite their use of more modern techniques.

At its core, Afro is a tribute to the centuries-old slave songs of Africans forcefully brought to the Americas. Taking the lyrics of these songs – comparable to the soulful spirituals and gospel Africans would create in America – and reinterpreting them through digital means, Novalima educates two crowds simultaneously: those interested in learning about the rich and tumultuous history of Peruvian land and its people, and those seeking fresh dance music.

Take for instance “Zamba Lando,” a modern rendering of the Lando style. Originally conceived in cotton fields, it is a perfect example of the cross-pollination of forms across continents. Much like gospel, it’s a style that takes the deep blues of slavery and transforms the energy into uplifting, at times even erotic music. Novalima’s take is equally inspired, fueled by a bouncing bass line and staccato keyboard effects. The opening “Chinchivi” is another chant-based track, beautifully layered with a soft, melodic undertone. Melody remains constant even amid the more upbeat dance floor kinetics of “Candela” and “Alcajazz,” the latter featuring some serious ivory tinkling.

The brainchild of producers Ramón Pérez Prieto, Rafael Morales, Carlos Li Carrillo and Grimaldo del Solar, Afro – an abbreviation of Afro-Peru/Afro-Peruvian – is not limited to the land itself. Recorded in Lima, London, Rio de Janeirio, Hong Kong and Barcelona, this band is the very definition of “world” culture. Employing a host of important names in Peruvian music for the recording such as legends Nicomedes Santa Cruz, Lucila Campos, Lucha Reyes and Zambo Cavero, Novalima spans generations as easily as terrain.

With their self-titled debut and numerous 12” singles behind them, the continual presence of Novalima in the global music community proves this band’s innate power. Now available stateside, Novalima is certain to accomplish for Afro-Peruvian music what Gotan Project has for Argentina'¹s tango: a modern upkeep of their culture’s traditional music, appealing to people of all ages and ethnicities. And with albums like Afro, that culture is truly global.

Mexican Institute of Sound (M.I.S.)
Camilo Lara, known as the Mexican Institute of Sound on stage, never set out with the intention of taking his personal musical career seriously. At first, Lara was simply creating holiday mixes for friends, but then his friends convinced him that he should take his songs into the studio. At the beginning of M.I.S., Lara was working days as the president of a major record label while concocting his debut album at night.

Thanks to the critical and commercial success of his breakthrough albums Pinata and Soy Sauce, the accidental rockstar now tours the world performing at major festivals like Coachella and Lollapalooza. While early M.I.S. songs combined a variety of vintage samples into instrumental tracks, “Politico” features entirely original songs recorded with a live band and vocals.

The new album, aptly titled Politico, comes at a precarious time in Mexican politics, with escalating drug violence and a bitterly contested presidential election scheduled for summer 2012. Camilo Lara explains, The result is an album of explosive club bangers that bridge worlds between Mexico City, Tokyo, Barcelona, and New York, traversing Lara’s wild musical imagination with a witty sense of humor.

As the M.I.S. recording and songwriting process has evolved, so has the live show. It has developed from simply “pushing buttons” to incorporating a full live band. In the past year, M.I.S. has brought the band to rock stages from Denmark to Japan, including major shows at Central Park Summer Stage, VIVE Latino, Lollapalooza, and Coachella. Mexican Institute of Sound’s music has also had a wide range of high-profile television and videogame uses, including HBO's Entourage and East Bound and Down, as well as Californication and EA Sports’ FIFA soccer series and Grand Theft Auto V. http://windishagency.com/artists/mexican_institute_of_sound

DJ Leydis
DJ Leydis was born and raised in Cuba. Involved in the Cuban hip hop movement since it’s inception, DJ Leydis helped organized some of the countries most respected and attended events and community programs. In 2005, she co-founded Omegas Kilay. A hip-hop theater collective in Havana, Cuba, Omegas Kilay focused on presenting the poetry, music, experiences, and perspectives of artists such as DJ Yari, Danay Suarez, Nono, La LLave De IPG, La Negra, and Las Krudas. Along with her partner DJ Yari, DJ Leydis created the first all-female DJ mixtape in Cuba, contributing a special blend of new flavor and spirit to the international community. In addition, she performed across Cuba as the official spoken-word artist of Rande Acosta’s Platos Rosa. DJ Leydis has also been a featured subject of critically acclaimed and groundbreaking documentaries such as Inventos: Hip Hop Cubano, Jovenes Rebeldes, and Mi Revolution, and continues to be a keynote speaker on the subject of Cuban hip-hop culture. In 2006, DJ Leydis migrated to the United States to expand upon her work as a DJ. Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, she has worked with Erykah Badu, Questlove of The Roots, and other iconic American artists. Presently working on tour with Los Rakas & Las Krudas, DJ Leydis combines contemporary hits with a distinct fusion of Latin flavors, R&B classics, and roots reggae blends.
www.losrokas.com, www.laskrudas.com

Catalina Maria Johnson
Catalina Maria Johnson is a Chicago-based writer, international radio broadcaster, and music curator, on the air from Chicago to Mexico City to Berlin, hosting and producing the radio program and podcast Beat Latino. She writes a weekly column on music for HOY (Tribune Media), and is a member of the editorial board of Revista Contratiempo, one of the country’s premiere Spanish-language periodicals dedicated to Latin American thought in the United States. Catalina Maria also contributes to NPR's The Record, Gozamos, and Chicago Music and frequently makes appearance on NPR programs such as Alt.Latino, World Cafe, and Chicago's WBEZ.

In association with La Bohemia Productions

Media Sponsor:
SF Weekly

YBCA's programs are made possible in part by:
Adobe
Koret Foundation
National Endowment for the Arts

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts is grateful to the City of San Francisco for its ongoing support.

YBCA Performance 13-14 is made possible in part by:
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Salesforce

Additional Funding for YBCA Performance 13-14:
Zellerbach Family Foundation
Panta Rhea Foundation
New England Foundation for the Arts
and Members of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts